Satire and Humor

Everyone’s got their own feeling about what good satire is and I suppose it can be different to everyone, but the notion that satire has to be funny is misguided.

If you are still confused, please read Jonathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal.” Widely acclaimed as one of the foremost works of satire in the English language, it can be either hilarious or horrifying, depending on how you take it and in what context you’ve come upon it. Either reaction indicates a strong response and arguably goes farther in highlighting an issue than merely reporting on it would – not that we are on a mission to right wrongs or anything quite so noble.  We’re here to entertain, but if you should happen to learn something along the way, then so be it.

Thoughts on this issue from Wikipedia:

Satire and humour

Satirical works often contain “straight” (non-satirical) humour – usually to give some relief from what might otherwise be relentless “preaching”. This has always been the case, although it is probably more marked in modern satire. On the other hand some satire has little or no humour at all. It is not “funny” – nor is it meant to be.

Humour about a particular subject (politics, religion and art for instance) is not necessarily satirical because the subject itself is often a subject of satire. Nor is humour using the great satiric tools of irony, parody, or burlesque always meant in a satirical sense.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satire

The editorial content of this site is satire and parody. Real news is clearly marked. Lighten up.